arts, movies, music, pop culture · womens issues

Woman 3: “Grandma” Holt

Whatever you may think about adoption, good or evil, (and yes there are those who think it’s evil and I would be remiss to ignore that view) I have to mention Bertha “Grandma” Holt in this list and fairly early on. Not that Karen Carpenter is more important or anything, but I do have methods to my madness. (Stay tuned for said methods on day 31.)

For those who don’t know, Bertha and her husband, Harry, adopted the first group of Korean-American babies back in the 50s before that kind of thing was really done. They saw a program that showed all these children who were left behind by their idiot American fathers who were soldiers in the Korean war and got some poor farmer’s daughter knocked up and said sayonara. (They were really really dumb.)

The Holts wrote a letter to Congress who had to pass a law to “allow” them to legally adopt these children and bring them to the country to live. Funny how these things become legislative in nature. But you can just go bang some 12 yr old girl in another country for free.

But I digress…

So, Grandma Holt then started to find other families who wanted to adopt and fast forward to the 70s to Audrey and Roy Jester. (hint: I am adopted.) I don’t know if my parents ever met the Holts, but they might have.

So you could say she is personally influential in my life. And I am actually sincerely grateful for people like her and Harry who see a problem and don’t just turn the channel to the Lawrence Welk show. Cuz that stuff is as painful as pictures of 20 Amerasian kids living in a refrigerator box.

http://www.holtinternational.org/grandma/index.shtml

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2 thoughts on “Woman 3: “Grandma” Holt

  1. This is fantastic. Sometimes I feel the true saints are people like Grandma Holt. They are able to turn injustice around, selflessly. I loved the story. You are blessed too. I find this story important enough to preserve it in my personal file? Why? It suddenly gives me an idea to start a blog of stories where selfless people changed other lives. Or why don’t you start a blog say called SELFLESS SPIRITS? Thanks. Lovely story. It’s fun to tumble onto such blogs when I have nothing on still blue skied afternoons with gentle but boring breezes.

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